Incinerators

incinerators

 

The objective of waste incineration processes is to reduce or eliminate waste products, which involves combusting those materials. Not only is the incinerator fired with burners, but the waste material itself is often part of the fuel that generates heat in the process. However, the waste usually has a very low heating value, and hence the need for supplemental fuel. Compared to most other industrial combustion processes, by the very nature of the variability of the feed material, incineration is a more complicated and dynamic process.

 

The waste may be very wet after a rain storm, which may put a huge extra heat load on the incinerator. In some locations where waste materials are separated for recycling, the waste actually fed into the incinerator may have a much higher heating value compared to other incinerators where there is no separation of the waste. A complicating factor with incinerators is that the end product (e.g., the noncombustible waste) must also be disposed of, which means that one of the goals of most incineration processes is to produce minimal waste output. Because of waste material variability, other pollutants can be generated that are not normally associated with industrial combustion processes. An example is the burning of plastics, which can produce dioxins and furans. The types of incinerators can vary greatly, depending on a variety of factors. In some cases, waste materials to be destroyed can be fed through the burners. This is particularly true of waste hydrocarbon liquids. In addition to burning waste materials, outgoing pollutants require cleaning process to make it, environment friendly. To make the process cost effective, we can supply burners for fuels like coal gas / producer gas.

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